GuildWars2: Crafty Leveling

How Much for the Asura?

How Much for the Asura?

First off I should make the disclaimer that I love crafting. I am a big fan of games that offer a solid crafting system and Guild Wars 2 is no exception.

Now in most games crafting is pretty much a gold and time sink.

  • You don’t always get gear good for your class.
  • You can end up spending a lot of money on components.
  • You take time away from leveling because you’re in the city and not doing quests or killing mobs.

So crafting in many MMOs is something that you wait until end game to do when you have more cash and time on your hands. Guild Wars 2 breaks from that tradition. Though crafting is still a gold sink, it can be more rewarding to craft while leveling than in most MMOs.

First of all, crafting in GW2 doesn’t mean that you stop leveling. Even when crafting you can’t escape getting XP. Without swapping trade skills you might not be able to fully level a character exclusively through two trade skills, but you can put quite a few levels on a character while making armor for profit or personal use.

A good portion of my Necromancer’s levels game directly out of crafting. It has really reduced the grind for me since I enjoy having peaceful moments in the city to just relax. This also means that I don’t feel as though I’m wasting time while crafting, because my character is still progressing in levels.

Secondly, when crafting you can choose the item stats. You may not be able to mix and match for the exact stats you would like to have, but you do have several options to choose from.

Customizing your armor for your playstyle can make all the difference in the world. It can make leveling out in the world a lot easier, especially when soloing groups of mobs or skill challenge veterans. While better gear won’t make you a better player in GW2, it can give you more wiggle room in survivability and overall damage output.  You can also see which types of armors sell for the most on the AH and then recycle your old armor at a profit.

Third on the list we have the gold sink aspect of crafting. Usually the gold sink aspect is enough to bankrupt me in most games because I’m so focused on leveling a craft that I have a hard time keeping tabs on my gold. That can be a problem. In GW2 though, if you’re a crafty consumer you can save yourself some coin and recover some costs if you’re careful in your crafting.

When making armor or weapons you usually need the one piece that determines the stats of the item and two crafted pieces that form the item. For a chest piece you would need an insignia, the padding and the shell.

If you check the AH it can be sometimes cheaper to buy the insignia if you don’t have all the components required to make them. Usually the components go for a bit more. Sell what you have, then buy a whole insignia.

Same can be said for the padding and the shell items. If it costs 1 silver to pick up the chest padding, but it costs 2 silver for one piece of linen, then might as well save the linen you have for the rest of the armor and pick up the chest padding. This will save you those last pieces of linen you can use to make the less fabric intensive pieces of armor.

You can check the AH directly from the crafting table by right clicking on either the crafted components or the required materials.

Also a quick side note. If you make green items and don’t put runes in them they aren’t souldbound. That means you’ll be able to use them until you’re too big for them and then flog them on the AH.

If you put runes in them to boost your skills then they will be soulbound. That leaves you with two choices, vendoring them or salvaging them. Personally I’d salvage them. That usually helps to complete a monthly requirement and you can flog the components on the AH.

Everyone in the game can harvest. As long as you have tools that are the correct level for the harvestable item. This means that if you take the time to do some harvesting for yourself, it can go a long way in helping keep your costs down. Just bear in mind the tool cost, as you get higher in level they get more expensive.

If you want to gather all of the crafting components yourself that is an option. If you have a guild to help you, that saves a lot of time and energy. Otherwise the AH can be a handy if sometimes costly resource to help you get the materials you need. It just means trading off materials you don’t use to help make up the costs.

Personally I am getting a lot further in my Tailoring goals on my Necromancer. I am currently at around 250 Tailoring. That means I am really only at the halfway mark. I have a goal to craft one piece of ascended leggings so I have quite a bit of work ahead of me.

Until next time I’ll be working on level 60 on my Necromancer which is pretty much just around the bend as well as crafting 300. I’m working on little steps at a time. Hopefully you’re enjoying GW2 or your game of choice.

4 Comments

  1. pasmith July 8, 2014 7:40 am 

    My distant recollection is that it was pretty easy to farm ‘common’ items like ore (I was working on a weaponsmith) but there were some rare items… tiny fangs or something…. that always held me back.

    Are those more common now, or do you just buy them on the AH, or is there another trick?

    • Geistig July 8, 2014 11:35 am 

      They’re not really any less common. Mostly they drop in bags or off specific mobs. Things like the green ichor from spiders is pretty easy to get but the claws and fangs can be a real pain since they mostly drop from animals and they’ve been set to drop really, and I mean really rarely.

      Best bet is going for events with mobs that drop loot bags like Centaurs, risen, pretty much most humanoid mobs. You might not get exactly the component you need, but you can sell what you’re not looking for to make coin for what you DO want. So yeah then you’re back to the AH.

      • pasmith July 8, 2014 11:56 am 

        Cool, thanks for the tips!

        • Geistig July 9, 2014 12:02 am 

          Any time. I don’t know much but I have no problem sharing what has managed to filter into the madness.

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